Family Caregiving

18 May

Family Caregiving

A large part of the stress related to the dying of family members has to do with the challenges of providing care. People who have a terminal illness usually have important and wide-ranging needs for assistance in addition to the medical care they receive from physicians and other healthcare workers. A majority of people who are dying require home nursing care, help with transportation, homemaking services, and personal care. In many cases their families must take on the sub- stantial burden of caring for them. In some cases, home healthcare programs may help. Traditionally, women have provided most of the home care, even when the family member is the man’s parent or grandparent. But today, with most women working outside the home, men and members of religious or civic organ- izations have an opportunity to be more actively engaged in caring for the dying. People are relying increasingly on paid workers to provide the nonmedical care needed by family members who are dying.

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